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Coronavirus: How to clean and disinfect your tech gadgets

This is how to clean your smartphones, tablets, TVs, and PCs without causing damage.
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1 of 8 Charlie Osborne/ZDNet

PhoneSoap

If you want to disinfect your smartphone -- which is always a good idea after you've been ill, for example -- UV light-based options such as PhoneSoap can eradicate bacteria build-ups without damaging screens or delicate components.

PhoneSoap is on offer at Amazon for $79.95.

Via: Amazon

Affiliate disclosure: ZDNet may earn a commission from some of the products featured in this gallery.

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2 of 8 Charlie Osborne/ZDNet

Gel keyboard cleaners

We've all experienced crumbs caught in keyboards, dust piling up, and even worse, the dried remains of a spilled drink. Attempting to clean keyboards without excessive water use can be hard, and so vendors now offer gel and adhesive alternatives which will not damage your electronics.

You can pick up a pack of four over at Amazon for $9.99.

Via: Amazon

Affiliate disclosure: ZDNet may earn a commission from some of the products featured in this gallery.

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3 of 8 Charlie Osborne/ZDNet

OXO Good Grips cleaning brush

The silicon-based OXO Good Grips cleaning brush, available for $4.95, is a useful addition to your cleaning supplies for reaching difficult spots such as earphone jacks, the spots between your keyboard keys, and mobile device buttons, as well as the safe removal of dust from camera lenses. 

Via: Amazon

Affiliate disclosure: ZDNet may earn a commission from some of the products featured in this gallery.

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WHOOSH! cleaning spray

For $15.99 you can pick up a cleaning spray dedicated to electronic devices. WHOOSH! does not contain harsh chemicals that could damage or erode screens.

Via: Amazon

Affiliate disclosure: ZDNet may earn a commission from some of the products featured in this gallery.

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5 of 8 Charlie Osborne/ZDNet

MiracleWipes

A cheaper alternative is MiracleWipes, a $9.97 set of 30 individual wipes for cleaning up television screens, smartphones, tablets, and laptops.

Via: Amazon

Affiliate disclosure: ZDNet may earn a commission from some of the products featured in this gallery.

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6 of 8 Charlie Osborne/ZDNet

Compressed air cans

Compressed air cans and systems, such as the Amfat reusable device available on Amazon for $79.99, can be invaluable in cleaning away dust bunnies and muck that may be clogging up cooling systems in desktop PCs and laptops.

Via: Amazon

Affiliate disclosure: ZDNet may earn a commission from some of the products featured in this gallery.

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7 of 8 Charlie Osborne/ZDNet

Microfiber cloths

Often, the simplest, safest, and most gentle way to clean your gadgets is to use a microfiber cloth. When slightly damp, these cloths can capture dust, dirt, smudges, and oil. Amazon offers a basic pack of 24 for $10.

Via: Amazon

Affiliate disclosure: ZDNet may earn a commission from some of the products featured in this gallery.

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8 of 8 Charlie Osborne/ZDNet

What to avoid

  • Window cleaning, general-purpose and alcohol sprays: Some displays have anti-oil and water protections, and chemicals in these products can lead to gradual screen erosion.
  • Paper: Paper towels can be abrasive enough to leave scratches on fragile screens and displays. 
  • Vinegar: Even when diluted with water, you are running the risk of stripping protective coatings from device screens. Avoid at all costs.

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