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ID cards, driverless buses and virtual shipwrecks

Photos of the month - September 2008
By Tim Ferguson, Contributor on
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1 of 19 Tim Ferguson/ZDNET

Photos of the month - September 2008

The MoD showed off the computer games it uses to give army drivers in the Royal Logistics Corps experience of situations they might face in the Middle East.

Here's a driver giving the tech a spin. To see more click here.

Photo credit: Ministry of Defence (MoD)

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September saw the launch of LG's take on the mini laptop craze. The Netbook X110 comes in several colours including the white and pink shown here.

Get up close and personal with the Korean electronics giant's device here.

Photo credit: LG

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This is the Amstrad 'Colour Personal Computer' that Sir Alan Sugar launched in 1984 to rival the ZX Spectrum and Commodore 64.

See what else silicon.com saw at the National Museum of Computing based at Bletchley Park, home of World War II code-breakers and the Colossus code-cracking supercomputer.

Photo credit: Andy McCue/silicon.com

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Owen Memanin of Wood Lane in North London shows his support for Nasa hacker Gary McKinnon outside the Home Office following the refusal by the European courts to block McKinnon's extradition to the US.

See how McKinnon's family, friends and other supporters showed their opposition to the decision in the full photo story.

Photo credit: Nick Heath/silicon.com

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Here's the Elliott 803 - the most popular British computer for businesses and universities during the 1960s.

The computer is on show at Bletchley Park's National Museum of Computing. See more here.

Photo Credit: Andy McCue/silicon.com

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More classic tech came in the shape of the PACE TR-48, also at Bletchley Park. The machine was made by Electronic Associates to simulate the firing of torpedoes underwater.

See more pics here showing how the machine was used to help design torpedoes and their control systems.

Photo credit: Andy McCue/silicon.com

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Solar thermal collectors on the roof are one of a number of methods used to heat the water supply of building-services company NG Bailey's showcase facility near Glasgow.

See what other tech goes into making a green building .

Photo credit: Julian Goldsmith/silicon.com

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8 of 19 Tim Ferguson/ZDNET

This is the inside of a driverless bus developed by scientists from the University of California, Berkeley. The bus uses sensors to detect magnetic fields created by magnets at the side of the road.

See more of the driverless bus in action here.

Photo credit: UC Berkeley

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silicon.com got a behind-the-scenes look at Sun Microsystems' manufacturing and testing facility near Edinburgh in Scotland.

This is one of the testing rooms where businesses can see what combination of hardware and software works best for them.

See what else Sun had on show including its new Executive Briefing Centre.

Photo credit: Tim Ferguson/silicon.com

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Another piece of computing history at the National Museum of Computing was this DEC seismometer array station processor, which was used to detect earthquakes in the 1970s.

Check out the full photo story for more pics and to see it in action check out this video.

Photo credit: Andy McCue/silicon.com

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TDK showed off its media tech heritage with the Life on Record trailer, which stopped off in London's Covent Garden last month.

One of the pieces of tech used to set the scene was this Atari 2600 games console that made an appearance in the 1980s section of the display.

Feed your tech nostalgia appetite with the full photo story.

Photo credit: Tim Ferguson/silicon.com

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HTC unveiled its Touch 3G, one of two touchscreen handsets from the maker intended to tempt customers away from Apple's iPhone.

Check out what other fancy features it has.

Photo credit: HTC

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This is a featherweight car developed by UK company Axon Automotive which the company claims can hit 100 miles per gallon.

The car was on display at the Cambridge Enterprise Conference along with lots of other ideas promising young tech entrepreneurs were eager to show off.

Photo credit: Nick Heath/silicon.com

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This is an IBM PC built for school use dating back to 1969. The device was one of many on display at IBM development laboratory at Hursley House which celebrated its 50th birthday in September.

Check out other tech at Big Blue's UK R&D hub here.

Photo credit: Julian Goldsmith/silicon.com

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Bluetooth trade association, the Bluetooth Special Interest Group, showcased a range of gadgetry at its annual Gift Guide Event including these Motorola Bluetooth speaker systems.

Check out other Bluetooth tech heading to a shop near you.

Photo credit: Natasha Lomas/silicon.com

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16 of 19 Tim Ferguson/ZDNET

A computer-generated graph illustrates a fictional flurry of terrorist attacks around Easter, helping predict when future atrocities might take place.

It's part of the range of tech UK law enforcers can use to pick apart terrorist gangs and criminal networks.

Find out more here.

Photo credit: Detica

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Tech execs, including Google's Sergey Brin and Larry Page, show off the first phone to run the Google Android open source operating system, the T-Mobile G1.

See more pictures of the phone following its New York launch.

Photo credit: Sarah Tew/CNET Networks

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Ever wanted to explore Europe's shipwrecks without donning your wetsuit? The Virtual Exploration of Underwater Sites (Venus) project is already working on it.

In order to create the images, the Venus project uses this remotely operated submarine that maps out each shipwreck and the surrounding seabed.

See some of the virtual images the project has produced so far here.

Picture credit: Venus project.

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Here's a first glimpse of the much-debated UK ID card the Home Office will soon introduce for foreign nationals coming to the UK.

This is the back of the card, displaying the chip that carries the holder's biometric details. See more pictures of the card here.

Photo credit: Chris Beaumont/silicon.com.

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