/>
X

Image Gallery: Apple iPad Experience Series

The Apple iPad is now available for purchase and through this new series I will be discussing different aspects of the device as it relates to life and daily usage. The Series will cover Bible applications, ebook readers, TV content, sports, games, and more.

|
matt-miller-headshot.jpg
|
Topic: iPhone
410349.jpg
1 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet
The Apple iPad is now available for purchase and through this new series I will be discussing different aspects of the device as it relates to life and daily usage. The Series will cover Bible applications, ebook readers, TV content, sports, games, and more.?

See Matthew Miller's Mobile Gadgeteer blog for more on his Apple iPad Experience

410350.jpg
2 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

There are a few settings in Bible HD as you can see in this pop-up.

410351.jpg
3 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Toggle on the low light view when you are reading in bed and want to reduce the backlight glare.

410352.jpg
4 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

You can email the verse to a buddy or bookmark it for later access.

410353.jpg
5 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

A quick tap on the upper left icon opens up your bookmarks.

410354.jpg
6 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

There are several different translations in many different languages.

410355.jpg
7 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Some translations are available for offline viewing so you do not need a wireless connection to read the Bible.

410356.jpg
8 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

When you first launch the Logos application you will be prompted to sign in or register for a free account.

410370.jpg
9 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Tapping Home takes you back to this screen.

410372.jpg
10 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

This screenshot shows you the full top and bottom menus available when you tap while reading.

410357.jpg
11 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

There are only a few settings available in the Logos Bible software, but the font selector is quite slick for finding just the size you like.

410358.jpg
12 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

While reading you can have the full page taken up with text. Tapping while reading slides out the top and bottom menu options.

410359.jpg
13 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

It is easy to jump to a book you wish to read.

410360.jpg
14 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Tapping the "i" in the upper right gives you information on that particular translation.

410361.jpg
15 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

There are a number of available titles in Logos, shown with their cover art.

410362.jpg
16 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

This is what the passage guide screen looks like.

410363.jpg
17 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

With this tool you can compare different translations for the same verse and conduct Bible study.

410364.jpg
18 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Some translations support cross references and other hyperlinking within the book.

410365.jpg
19 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Here is another example of data in the translation.

410366.jpg
20 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Tapping and holding on a word launches a search with the option to jump to Bible word study.

410367.jpg
21 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Here is a sample of what a Bible word study will look like once you find a word to evaluate.

410368.jpg
22 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

When you slide your finger up the display this is the pop-up that will appear. You have several options available to you now.

410369.jpg
23 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

You can share the verse via email, Twitter, or Facebook.

410373.jpg
24 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Gallery thumbnail 1

410374.jpg
25 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Gallery thumbnail 2

410482.jpg
26 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

The nook and Sony Reader are much smaller and more focused than the iPad, but the multiple client support and backlighting may make the iPad a perfectly capable ebook reader.

410448.jpg
27 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Apple has a UI in their ebook reader that most closely models physical books, starting with modeling a bookshelf.

410449.jpg
28 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

There is a store modeled after the App Store for you to purchase ebook titles directly. You can also find many free public domain books so there is no cost to give it a go.

410450.jpg
29 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Here is a shot of shopping in the iBooks store from your iPad.

410451.jpg
30 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Download a free title to test out the software.

410452.jpg
31 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Apple includes Winnie the Pooh in the iBooks application so iPad owners can get a full feel of the ebook reading experience.

410453.jpg
32 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

There is a simple slider bar for adjusting the brightness. Lowering the brightness is helpful for reading in bed.

410454.jpg
33 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

You can choose from ten font sizes and five different font types in iBooks.

410455.jpg
34 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

One slick thing I found was that non-DRM EPUB file formats are supported. You can find hundreds of free EPUB books to load up on your iPad.

410456.jpg
35 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

As you can see, the same reading interface and appearance as you can find in books purchased through the store is available in these books.

410457.jpg
36 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

You can view books in different ways as well.

410458.jpg
37 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

The background of the Kindle application changes dynamically with the time of day.

410459.jpg
38 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Tapping the small "i" opens up this menu where some information can be viewed.

410460.jpg
39 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Tapping on the center of the text makes a few menu option icons appear on the display.

410461.jpg
40 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Five font size choices are available, along with three background colors. A brightness slider is also present for controlling display backlighting. There do not appear to be any settings for font type.

410462.jpg
41 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Tapping the center icon gives you a few options for navigating quickly within the book.

410463.jpg
42 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

You can set a bookmark by tapping the upper right corner or +/- icon on the left of center.

410464.jpg
43 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

There is no Kindle ebook store within the application so the app launches the Kindle site in the web browser where you can make purchases.

410466.jpg
44 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

After signing into your Kobo account you will see your library appear in the center Library tab.

410467.jpg
45 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Tapping the I'm Reading tab forces a black page to appear with book covers for those you have open to choose from and start reading.

410468.jpg
46 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Unlike the Amazon client, Kobo has their ebook store integrated into the iPad client.

410469.jpg
47 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

You can select from seven different bookshelf forms to use with Kobo on your iPad.

410470.jpg
48 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

The bookshelf type switches automatically and they are easy to change.

410471.jpg
49 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

You can switch from bookshelf mode to a thumbnail and detail mode.

410472.jpg
50 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Kobo books appear in almost full screen with just the very small black time and signal status bar appearing. I like seeing the time so find this a nice solution.

410474.jpg
51 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Tapping on the center of the text opens up several options for managing your reading experience.

410475.jpg
52 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Four different font sizes are available in Kobo.

410476.jpg
53 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

You can toggle quickly between day and night modes while also adjusting the brightness through several different levels.

410477.jpg
54 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

You can tap the upper right corner or bookmark icon to toggle bookmarks.

410478.jpg
55 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

You can toggle animations and then select which type you want to see appear on the iPad.

410479.jpg
56 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

This is a view of the landscape mode of the Kobo library.

410480.jpg
57 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Thumbnail 1

410481.jpg
58 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Thumbnail 2

411477.png
59 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Here is a typical Day view in the Calendar.

411478.png
60 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

A typical week view with appointments sprinkled throughout.

411479.png
61 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Typical Calendar month view.

411480.png
62 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

The List view shows you your upcoming appointments as a list of items.

411481.png
63 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Here you can see what happens when you tap to add an event in landscape orientation in List view mode.

411482.png
64 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

As you can see portrait orientation gives you a slightly different view of your data.

411483.png
65 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

By tapping the option in the upper left, you can respond to meeting invitations.

411484.png
66 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

This view of the calendar in portrait mode shows you what editing an event looks like.

411485.png
67 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

I personally like the way that tapping on an appointment in Week or Month views opens up the details for you to see.

411486.png
68 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Search is quite slick and as you enter letters your data is sorted automatically.

411487.png
69 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

As you can see Contacts in portrait orientation is not very well done or optimized.

411488.png
70 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

In landscape orientation your contacts appear similar to a basic address book.

411489.png
71 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

You can open up and edit a contact on the iPad.

411490.png
72 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

You can also create a new contact with a few selected fields available for data entry.

411491.png
73 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Apple gives Notes a cool look in landscape orientation, but the functionality is the same as on the iPhone.

411492.png
74 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

As you can see Notes looks the same as on the iPhone, only bigger.

411851.jpg
75 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

When you first launch Evernote you are taken to a view that shows all your notes. They are arranged with the most recent at the top and you will find a slider timeline bar on the right, much like the desktop version of Evernote.

411852.jpg
76 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

If you tap the bottom right icon then the menu shown here appears. This is the Synchronization menu that lets you manage sync settings for your account.

411853.jpg
77 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

With Evernote on the iPhone and iPad you can select notebooks to have downloaded right to your device so that your notes are fully accessible without a wireless data connection.

411854.jpg
78 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Handwritten notes are not supported in Evernote, but you can enter text based notes using the iPad keyboard.

411855.jpg
79 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

In addition to text notes you can add voice memos to a note as well. Evernote on the iPad actually supports multiple types of data in a single note.

411856.jpg
80 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

You can easily add photos to your notes too, but unfortunately there is no camera to capture images with the iPad.

411857.jpg
81 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

You can tap and select the notebook you wish to save your note in while creating a new note.

411858.jpg
82 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Photos appear and look great in your notes.

411859.jpg
83 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

If you have a note with a photo in it then you can use the multi-touch capabilities of the iPad to zoom in and pan around.

411860.jpg
84 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

You can see all of your notebooks in this enhanced iPad view. You can sort them by name or note count.

411861.jpg
85 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

You can also tap the top button and choose to view your notes by tags. Tags can be sorted by name and note count as well.

411862.jpg
86 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Sample text note in portrait orientation shows you several options/buttons at the bottom for sending or editing notes.

411863.jpg
87 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Evernote added geo-location tagging several months ago and with this cool view you can view your notes by location.

411864.jpg
88 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

As you can see you can view location-based notes in satellite, map, and hybrid view modes. There is a button to also have Evernote determine your location.

411865.jpg
89 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

One of the most powerful things about Evernote is the search functionality. As you browse through search results you will find your search word highlighted in yellow if the text is in the note body.

411866.jpg
90 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Search results appear as thumbnails that you can then simply tap and view in detail.

411867.jpg
91 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

I am finding that landscape orientation is a better way to use Evernote than in portrait mode.

411868.jpg
92 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

This screenshot shows you how browsing a photo note appears in landscape orientation.

411869.jpg
93 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Here is a short of your notebooks in landscape.

411870.jpg
94 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

You can sync your Safari bookmarks and get the web clipper capability on your iPad.

411871.jpg
95 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Tapping the web clipper bookmark makes the Evernote pop-up appear where you can select to clip the website URL or the entire page.

411872.jpg
96 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

You can even select a notebook to save your clipped page into right from the bookmark utility.

412223.jpg
97 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

The iPhone 3GS does a good job of showing the full web.

412224.jpg
98 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

The full website appears on the iPhone.

412225.jpg
99 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

When I visit my bank I am taken to the mobile version of the website. This is fine with me since they do have an iPhone-optimized site and even an application that lets me deposit with a photo.

412226.jpg
100 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

The full version of the New York Times does appear on the iPhone 3GS.

412227.jpg
101 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Why pay for the subscription when you can view the Wall Street Journal through the web browser?

412228.jpg
102 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

When you go to CNN you are taken to the mobile iPhone-optimized version of the site.

412229.jpg
103 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

When you visit the USA Today site you are also taken to the mobile version of the site.

412230.jpg
104 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

As you can see, more information is present on the large display of the iPad compared to the iPhone.

412231.jpg
105 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Again, the full site is supported and a joy to visit on the iPad.

412232.jpg
106 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

The full USAA bank site is accessible on the Apple iPad.

412233.jpg
107 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

Again, there are no real limits on the iPad.

412234.jpg
108 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

The Wall Street Journal looks very good on the iPad.

412235.jpg
109 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

No mobile version here again.

412236.jpg
110 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

The one limit you will find on the iPad is the inability to play Flash. I have only found the N900 native browser to support Flash on the go.

412237.jpg
111 of 111 Matthew Miller/ZDNet

USA Today looks good, but I still find the dedicated iPad application to be the preferred method for reading it.

Related Galleries

iOS 15's "all-you-can-eat" iCloud storage offer
Transfer or Reset iPhone settings

Related Galleries

iOS 15's "all-you-can-eat" iCloud storage offer

4 Photos
Step by step: Setting up a new iPhone 13
Unboxing the iPhone 13 Pro Max

Related Galleries

Step by step: Setting up a new iPhone 13

21 Photos
First look: iPhone 13 Apple event [in pictures]
california-streaming-2.jpg

Related Galleries

First look: iPhone 13 Apple event [in pictures]

72 Photos
Nomad Rugged Leather Moment case: MagSafe, 10-foot protection, and advanced lens support
nomad-moment-iphone-12pm-1.jpg

Related Galleries

Nomad Rugged Leather Moment case: MagSafe, 10-foot protection, and advanced lens support

7 Photos
CASETiFY MagSafe cases for iPhone 12: Customizable protection with support for Apple's technology
casetify-magsafe-iphone-12-1.jpg

Related Galleries

CASETiFY MagSafe cases for iPhone 12: Customizable protection with support for Apple's technology

8 Photos
ESR HaloLock MagSafe stands for Apple iPhone 12 review: Affordable, functional accessories
esr-magsafe-1.jpg

Related Galleries

ESR HaloLock MagSafe stands for Apple iPhone 12 review: Affordable, functional accessories

16 Photos
Presidio Perfect-Clear and Shieldview Glass for iPhone 12 Pro Max: Clear protection for the front and back
speck-iphone-12-pro-max-1.jpg

Related Galleries

Presidio Perfect-Clear and Shieldview Glass for iPhone 12 Pro Max: Clear protection for the front and back

6 Photos