/>
X

Motorola XOOM (Verizon) Teardown

Bill Detwiler cracks open the Motorola XOOM, which runs on the Nvidia Tegra T2 dual-core CPU and has chips from Samsung, Toshiba, Broadcom, and more.
6197910.jpg
1 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

For the past year, the Apple iPad has been the king of the tablet/slate PC market. Motorola is seeking to unseat the iPad with the XOOM, a 10.1-inch tablet with impressive hardware from tech heavyweights like Nvidia, Toshiba, Samsung, Texas Instruments, Broadcom, Qualcomm, Hynix, and more. Follow along as he crack open the Motorola XOOM in this TR Dojo Teardown gallery.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197911.jpg
2 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

As of this writing, the Motorola XOOM is available in the U.S. for $599 (with a 2-yr contract from Verizon) or $799 (with no contract). It runs Google's Android 3.0 (Honeycomb) operating system. The first XOOMs are 3G models, but Verizon plans to offer an LTE 4G upgrade. Once we begin dissecting the device, you'll see how.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197912.jpg
3 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

The Motorola XOOM weighs 1.6 lbs. and measures 9.8 x 6.6 x 0.5 inches.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197913.jpg
4 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197914.jpg
5 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Inside the box, we find the Motorola XOOM tablet, USB cable, power adapter, and product documentation.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197915.jpg
6 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

The Motorola XOOM has a 10.1-inch, touch-sensitive display. The clear plastic film that protects the screen also tells you where important components (such as the volume buttons and Webcam) are located.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197916.jpg
7 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

The Motorola XOOM has a 10.1-inch WXGA display that supports a 1280 x 800 resolution. On the front of the device, you'll find the 2MP Webcam, Webcam indicator LED, notification LED, and charging LED.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197917.jpg
8 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Here's a closer look at the Motorola XOOM's 5MP, front-facing Webcam and associated indicator LED.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197918.jpg
9 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

On the back of the Motorola XOOM are the external speakers, 5MP rear-facing camera, camera flash, and power/lock button.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197919.jpg
10 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Here's a closer look at the Motorola XOOM's external speaker.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197920.jpg
11 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Here's a closer look at the Motorola XOOM's 5MP rear-facing camera, camera flash, left-side external speaker, and power/lock button.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197921.jpg
12 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

The Motorola XOOM has a single opening for the device's microSD card and SIM card slots. Both slots are filled with dummy cards made of clear plastic. According to Motorola documentation, neither can currently be used. The SIM slot will be used once the device is upgraded to LTE 4G and the microSD slot will be activated with a future software update.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197922.jpg
13 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

In addition to the SIM card and microSD card slots, the Motorola XOOM's headphone jack is located along the top edge.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197923.jpg
14 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Along the left Motorola XOOM's left edge are the volume up and down buttons.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197924.jpg
15 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Along the Motorola XOOM's bottom edge are the Micro USB port, HDMI port, and power adapater port. There are also two Torx T5 screws, which we'll need to remove in just a moment.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197925.jpg
16 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

The first step in opening the Motorola XOOM is removing the two Torx T5 screws located along the bottom edge. Luckily Motorola didn't use any security screws--like the annoying pentalobe screws Apple is using on several devices.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197926.jpg
17 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197927.jpg
18 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

With the two external case screws removed, you can slide the back cover down about two inches. Internal catches prevent the cover from sliding completely off.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197928.jpg
19 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Using a plastic spudger or thin metal blade, you can release the internal catches the prevent the back cover from sliding all the way off.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197929.jpg
20 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Once the internal catches are released, you can slide the back cover away from the Motorola XOOM internal frame.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197930.jpg
21 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

With the back cover removed, we get our first look inside the Motorola XOOM. We can already see the large battery and part of the main PCB.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197931.jpg
22 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

With the back, metal cover removed, we'll turn our attention to the plastic cover that protects the rear-facing camera, speakers, flash, and power/lock button. Two Torx screws hold this plastic strip in place.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197932.jpg
23 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Even with its two screws removed, you can't lift the plastic cover away from the Motorola XOOM's internal frame just yet. A thin ribbon cable for the volume up and down buttons (right side) still connects the cover to the main PCB.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197933.jpg
24 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Using a plastic spudger, I disconnected the volume buttons' ribbon cable from Motorola XOOM's the main PCB.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197934.jpg
25 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

With the thin plastic cover removed, the Motorola XOOM's main PCB is completely exposed.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197935.jpg
26 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197936.jpg
27 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

As with the Apple iPad, Dell Streak, and Samsung Galaxy tab, the Motorola XOOM's battery takes up much of the space inside the case. We'll start our internal dissection by removing the battery.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197937.jpg
28 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

The battery is held to the Motorola XOOM's internal frame with 12 Torx T6 screws.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197938.jpg
29 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

There are another two Torx T5 screws holding the battery connector to the main PCB.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197939.jpg
30 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Before removing the Motorola XOOM's battery, you'll also need to detach this tiny connector, which is attached to a pair of very thin red and black wires.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197940.jpg
31 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

With all the screws removed and the connectors detached, you can lift the Motorola XOOM's battery away from the internal frame.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197941.jpg
32 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

The Motorola XOOM has a 7.4V 3250 mAh 24.1 Wh Li-ion battery.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197942.jpg
33 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197943.jpg
34 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

With the battery removed, we'll turn our attached to a small card witout any chips. This appears to a placeholder card for the LTE 4G upgrade that Verizon is promising for the Motorola XOOM.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197944.jpg
35 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

The LTE 4G placeholder card is held in place with a pair of Torx T5 screws. two antenna wires are also connected to the card.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197945.jpg
36 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

With the screws removed and the wires disconnected, you can lift the placeholder card away from the metal frame.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197946.jpg
37 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197947.jpg
38 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197948.jpg
39 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197949.jpg
40 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

We'll turn our attention to the cameras next. First, we'll remove the rear-facing 5MP camera. It is connected to the Motorola XOOM's main PCB via a black plastic spacer and very thin ribbon cable.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197950.jpg
41 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197951.jpg
42 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

After removing the Motorola XOOM's 5MP rear-facing camera, we'll disconnect the 2MP front0facing Webcam.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197952.jpg
43 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197953.jpg
44 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197954.jpg
45 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197955.jpg
46 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197956.jpg
47 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197957.jpg
48 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Next, we'll remove the Motorola XOOM's external speakers. Each speaker is connected to the main PCB with a small, black connector.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197958.jpg
49 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

With the speaker's connector detached, you can lift the speaker away from the Motorola XOOM's metal frame.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197959.jpg
50 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

A thin adhesive film holds the speaker to the frame, but you sould be able to remove the speaker without completely removing the film.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197960.jpg
51 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

To remove the Motorola XOOM's right-side speaker, use the the same process as on the left.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197961.jpg
52 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197962.jpg
53 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Before we can remove the Motorola XOOM's main PCB, we'll need to disconnect the antenna wires that run allong the top edge.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197963.jpg
54 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

The Motorola XOOM's antenna wires are held to the main PCB with metal clips. You can easily pull the wires out of the clips and away from the circuit boad. The wires will remain soldered to a contact plate attached to touchscreen's bezel.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197964.jpg
55 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

With the placeholder LTE 4G card, speakers, and antenna wires, removed, we can begin removing the screws that hold the Motorola XOOM's main PCB in place.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197965.jpg
56 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

After removing all the main PCB's screws. You'll also need to detach several cables.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197966.jpg
57 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

You'll also need to detach larger cables, such as this one for the Motorola XOOM's display.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197967.jpg
58 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

With all the screws and cables removed, you can lift the Motorola XOOM's main PCB away from the internal metal frame.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197968.jpg
59 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197969.jpg
60 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

More than a dozen screws and adhesive hold the Motorola XOOM's front panel to the metal frame and display. As you can see the touchscreen's controller chips without removing it from the display assembly, I decided to leave it in place. I want to put this unit back together in complete working order.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197970.jpg
61 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

The Motorola XOOM's touchscreen uses an Atmel mXT1386 controller with markings MXT1386X ES-U 1035I TH 0P2110.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197971.jpg
62 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Looking at the top of the Motorola XOOM's main PCB we can't see any of the chips. They're all hidden beneath metal shields, and unfortunately the shields are soldered to the PCB. As I want to reassemble with XOOM in working order, I'm not going to risk damaging the chips or their contacts by cutting the shields loose.

Luckly, our friends over at iFixit did go through the painstaking process of removing the shields. So, we know that hidden under the shields are an Nvidia Tegra T2 dual-core CPU, Broadcom AGPS, Broadcom Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 2.1, and FM Tuner, Qualcomm HSPA+ chip and Samsung DRAM module.

For a closer look at the chips, check out iFixit.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197972.jpg
63 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Just like the shields on the front of the main PCB, those on the back are soldered in place. Again, iFixit comes to the recue. Under these shields, there are chips from Qualcomm, Atmel, Toshiba, and ST Ericsson.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

6197973.jpg
64 of 64 Bill Detwiler/ZDNet

Overall the Motorola XOOM was very easy to disassemble. It has standard Torx T6 and T5 screws. The XOOM also feels like a sturdy and well constructed tablet. And, it should be for $800. Unfortunately, it's unlikely that you'll be able to get spare parts for XOOM anytime soon.

Photo by: Bill Detwiler / TechRepublic
Caption by: Bill Detwiler

Related Galleries

Cybersecurity flaws, customer experiences, smartphone losses, and more: ZDNet's research roundup
shutterstock-1024665187.jpg

Related Galleries

Cybersecurity flaws, customer experiences, smartphone losses, and more: ZDNet's research roundup

8 Photos
Inside a fake $20 '16TB external M.2 SSD'
Full of promises!

Related Galleries

Inside a fake $20 '16TB external M.2 SSD'

8 Photos
Hybrid working, touchscreen MacBook hopes, cybersecurity concerns, and more: ZDNet's tech research roundup
Asian woman working at a desk in front of a computer and calculator

Related Galleries

Hybrid working, touchscreen MacBook hopes, cybersecurity concerns, and more: ZDNet's tech research roundup

8 Photos
Developer trends, zero-day risks, 5G speeds, and more: Tech research roundup
Person seated at a booth in a cafe looks at their phone and laptop.

Related Galleries

Developer trends, zero-day risks, 5G speeds, and more: Tech research roundup

10 Photos
Drive Electric Day: A dizzying array of EVs in sunny Florida
ca3b4019-26c5-4ce0-a844-5aac39e2c34b.jpg

Related Galleries

Drive Electric Day: A dizzying array of EVs in sunny Florida

16 Photos
Incipio, Kate Spade, and Coach cases for Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra: hands-on
s22-ultra-incipio-coach-cases-2.jpg

Related Galleries

Incipio, Kate Spade, and Coach cases for Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra: hands-on

15 Photos
Casetify Impact Crush Galaxy S22 Ultra case hands-on: in pictures
casetify-s22-ultra-3.jpg

Related Galleries

Casetify Impact Crush Galaxy S22 Ultra case hands-on: in pictures

10 Photos