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New student tools hit Office 2007

These newly released applications will make journal authoring and article licensing easier for those who work or study in higher education. This gallery will show you the two new tools from Microsoft Research; what they do and what you can do with them.
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1 of 17 Zack Whittaker/ZDNet

Every journal will have its own style of authoring. This screen allows you to pick out specific keywords or groups of keywords in your article.

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2 of 17 Zack Whittaker/ZDNet
Of course you can easily edit your templates by removing parts of the document which aren't necessarily appropriate for the journal.
In scientific articles, you may want a "results" area, whereas in a criminology article, you may not have the need for one. This add-in makes it easy to customise your publication to what your article needs.
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3 of 17 Zack Whittaker/ZDNet

As you can see, the add-in makes it easy to add any section you may need, for any article you may wish to write. This ultimately makes it easy for entering into the repository at your university or publisher.

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4 of 17 Zack Whittaker/ZDNet

With a quick check in the settings of the add-in, you can apply the Notes Panel. This panel allows you to add notes to the front and back of your article.

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5 of 17 Zack Whittaker/ZDNet

Instead of saving it as a .docx or a .doc document, this new format, the NLM allows seamless integration with the soon-to-be-released Research Output Repository Platform (we think, not much details out there yet). The RORP will act as the server back-end repository to NLM files.

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6 of 17 Zack Whittaker/ZDNet

As you can see, it saves it as the NLM XML format - easily integrates into most repositories out there on the market.

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7 of 17 Zack Whittaker/ZDNet

This seems to take a while to do, but then again, it does apply a lot of data to your seemingly-ordinary document.

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8 of 17 Zack Whittaker/ZDNet

Even though this add-in is at RC1 (Release Candidate 1) stage, there are still a few updates in the works which will make the software faster, better working and will have all the bugs ironed out of.

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9 of 17 Zack Whittaker/ZDNet

And this is what your final document looks like in Notepad... a bunch of XML and some other "open content types" which Mary-Jo and the other Microsoft watchers keep going on about :)

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10 of 17 Zack Whittaker/ZDNet

Don't be fooled by the first screen you see. The installation process isn't a case of a single setup.exe, but requires an Internet connection to download all the necessary bits and bobs and third-party stuff.

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11 of 17 Zack Whittaker/ZDNet
Presenting another tab in the Ribbon, this is your licence center. This lets you pre-define Creative Commons licences, tells you which licenses you have created, and also tells you the licence applied to the document.
In this case, there's no licences created, therefore no licence attached to the document.
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12 of 17 Zack Whittaker/ZDNet
Going through the wizard, you can customise your document's licence easily by selecting the choices available.
(Keep an eye on the licence in the top right hand corner - it changes each dialog box with each option you select.)
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13 of 17 Zack Whittaker/ZDNet

Again, the wizard explains each step to make sure you create the exact licence you need.

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14 of 17 Zack Whittaker/ZDNet

The document I'm using is a draft written for Enterprise Alley. As the copyright technically belongs to ZDNet (or CNET, maybe CBS, I can't keep up), I choose my options carefully.

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15 of 17 Zack Whittaker/ZDNet

If you live in a specific locale, you can create your licence under your local law. In my case, I've selected the UK (England and Wales) as that's where I live.

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16 of 17 Zack Whittaker/ZDNet

Once you've created a licence, you apply it to the document by clicking on it. It shows the licence image and the basic information of it, allowing you to make sure you distinguish between your licences.

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17 of 17 Zack Whittaker/ZDNet
There we go - a Creative Commons licence created very simply and applied to my document. This now makes it clear to anyone reading it what they can and can't do with my work.
Basically nothing. :)

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