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Photos of the Month - November 2007

Floating computers, bizarre power sources, wacky races, the iPhone launch and much, much more...
By Tim Ferguson, Contributor on
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1 of 14 Tim Ferguson/ZDNET

Floating computers, bizarre power sources, wacky races, the iPhone launch and much, much more...

Kicking off our photo stories this month was the iPhone launch on 9 November. Natasha Lomas went down to Apple's flagship store on Regent Street in London to see who was in the queue.

See what she discovered while shooting the breeze with the Apple faithful.

Photo credit: Natasha Lomas

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A team of explorers sent the most northerly transmitted video message over their satellite communications system this month.

The team were trialling technology that will be used when the three-strong Vanco Arctic survey team makes its way to the North Pole next year.

See more here .

In October, the team put the tech through its paces in the rather less demanding environment of London's Hyde Park.

Photo credit: Martin Hartley

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A race of driverless cars took place on a former airbase in California this month run by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

The overall challenge was won by Carnegie Mellon University's offering Boss, which narrowly beat Stanford University's robot, called Junior. This is MIT's robot, Talos.

See what else happened in this real life wacky race.

One of the competitors, Team Lux showed off their car in London's Science Museum earlier this year. See the picture story here.

Photo credit: Stefanie Olsen/CNET News.com

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One of the world's first digital computers creaked into life again this month as Bletchley Park's code-cracking Colossus began running for the first time in more than 60 years.

It was used to crack Nazi codes in the World War II and was one of the world's first programmable computers.

Tony Sale, the man responsible for the 14-year rebuild, is seen here posing with the machine.

See more here.

Photo credit: The National Museum of Computing

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Tim Ferguson visited London's newly reopened St Pancras station to check out what technology Eurostar passengers are benefiting from at the new high-speed train terminal.

This picture shows the famous Barlow train shed which houses the impressively restored Victorian station.

See our photo story that went behind the scenes at St Pancras a month before it opened.

Photo credit: Tim Ferguson

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There are some unusual power sources on the horizon, so Gemma Simpson had a look at what we can expect to see over the next few years.

From a solar-powered bikini to wireless electricity, there is certainly an interesting range of options.

This picture shows how a Japanese railway company is using the energy from passengers' footsteps to power its stations.

See more here.

Photo credit: Japan Railways Group, New York Office

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Tim Ferguson made his way to Manchester to check out the high tech City Inn hotel where every room comes complete with an Apple iMac computer.

The idea is that these form the centre of entertainment for guests, with DVD player, television and web access all available.

This picture shows the setup in one of the rooms.

To see how it all works, check out the full photo story.

Photo credit: Tim Ferguson

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This story looks at how Belgian scientists have been experimenting to see if or how cockroaches interact with robot bugs.

The results make interesting viewing.

Photo credit: Courtesy of José Halloy/Free University of Brussels

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The Argo programme uses thousands of floating computers to provide continuous data from the remotest parts of the world's oceans.

The information gained from around 3,000 of these floats around the globe help scientists assess climate change and sea level.

This is one of the floats deployed in the Southern Ocean by the University of Washington in October.

Find out how this clever tech works here.

Photo credit: University of California, San Diego

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The London Transport Museum opened it doors this month after a two-year refurbishment programme.

One of the new exhibitions uses technology to show visitors what impact their decisions could have on urban living and transport in the future.

This picture shows one of the possible scenarios in 2055.

See what else is in store for visitors here.

Photo credit: Tim Ferguson

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This is the Kindle, Amazon.com's e-book reader, which sold out almost immediately after its release. The device weighs in at just 10.3 ounces, so should be perfect for commuting.

Is this the future for reading the newspaper on the train? Take a look here.

Photo credit: Amazon.com

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Mobile devices are all the rage in the emergency services for their obvious benefits in tricky situations.

This shows how a Buckinghamshire fireman is using a mobile device to carry out risk assessments and fire safety audits.

Click through to the photo story to see what other mobile tools are making the lives of emergency workers easier.

Photo credit: Buckinghamshire & Milton Keynes Fire Authority

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13 of 14 Tim Ferguson/ZDNET

The latest version of the US Army's Black Hawk helicopter uses some cutting edge technology.

This picture shows the multifunction display in the cockpit in one of the new Black Hawks which can switch between different pilot tools and instrumentation for changing conditions.

See what other tech has been introduced.

Photo credit: Courtesy of Sikorsky

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First we got Google Earth and now there's Google Sky which lets you explore the night sky.

This image shows the centre portion of a spiral 'edge-on' galaxy, similar to our Milky Way but lying around 55 million light-years away from Earth.

See what other delights can be found.

Photo credit: Google Earth, Nasa and Space Telescope Science Institute

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