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Get over 225 hours of Microsoft Windows and Azure training for under $60

Be prepared for any admin position with these 17 courses on MS 365, Windows, and Azure.
Written by StackCommerce, Partner on
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StackCommerce

The following content is brought to you by ZDNet partners. If you buy a product featured here, we may earn an affiliate commission or other compensation.

So many of us use Microsoft software that we often take it for granted. But if you're working in tech fields like IT administration or cloud services, then Windows OS isn't just your gateway to email and cat videos -- it's your livelihood. With the proper training and a few key certifications, anyone can turn Microsoft specialization into a career. And it's hard to find a better place to start than the Complete Microsoft 365, Windows, and Azure Bundle, now deeply discounted to $59.99.

This bundle is a collection of 17 courses on the most popular Microsoft platforms, courtesy of the tech educators at iCollege. Their ITProTV classes go way beyond the basics to offer the skills to help professionals enter tomorrow's workforce. With this kind of instruction, even the greenest IT workers can set up a cloud infrastructure or configure work software for a business of any size.

As the bundle title implies, you'll get a deep dive into the Windows operating system. There are complete courses on PowerShell that will let you set up and secure a business server and several tutorials on creating virtualized apps through the cloud. You'll see how to customize Azure to fit your traffic needs and learn how Microsoft Exchange can become your company's secure messaging hub.

Most importantly, you won't just come away from these classes ready for IT work. You'll also get study guides that prepare you for Azure certification exams like the AZ-900 and AZ-103 and Microsoft admin tests like the MS-100.

The Complete Microsoft 365, Windows, & Azure Bundle includes more than 225 hours of training, and it's all on sale for $59.99 -- that's about $3.50 per course.

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