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Robot enlisted for brain operations

No need to worry any longer about the surgeon's hand shaking during delicate brain surgery--intelligent robots are set to take over. The nerve-tingling prospect was put forward on Wednesday by UK-based Armstrong Healthcare Ltd which claims to have developed the world's first intelligent robot for image-guided surgery.
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Written by ZDNET Editors, Contributor on
No need to worry any longer about the surgeon's hand shaking during delicate brain surgery--intelligent robots are set to take over.

The nerve-tingling prospect was put forward on Wednesday by UK-based Armstrong Healthcare Ltd which claims to have developed the world's first intelligent robot for image-guided surgery.

Unveiling its "PathFinder" robot at a news conference in London, the firm said it would provide surgeons with a way of guiding instruments very precisely to the chosen site of the brain with minimal damage to surrounding tissue.

Potential uses included the treatment of brain tumors, Parkinson's disease, epilepsy and even new techniques of stem cell replacement therapy. --Reuters

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