Google releases first Android Q beta for Pixel phones

The first Android Q beta is now available for testing.

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Google just released Android Q for early adopters and developers. Unlike previous years, where the first preview release for the next Android update was released only for developers, Google has made the first Android Q beta available to anyone who wants to sign up.

Also: Android Q: Rumors, features, and everything we know so far

Of course, you'll need an eligible device in order to take part in the beta. Currently, Google is offering Android Q to all Pixel phones. That's right, even the original Pixel phones can take part in the program.

Users who want are willing to deal with bugs and issues -- of which there will be plenty -- can enroll in the Android Beta for Pixel devices program here. (It's not quite live yet, so keep checking back.) 

We can't recommend you install an early beta, such as this one, on your primary device. There's no telling what apps or services will break due to changes made throughout the beta process. 

Developers who want a little more control over the installation can download the factory images and flash them to a compatible device. The images are posted on this page on the Android developer site. Keep in mind, devices that have the original image flashed will not receive OTA updates for future beta updates. Instead, you'll need to update with each release.


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Google also detailed changes users can expect to see in Android Q. The primary focus of Android Q is user privacy, with new permission controls, better support for foldable displays, improved sharing shortcuts, and the ability for developers to integrate system settings directly within an app. 

We will dive into the Android Q build and update this post as we uncover more details and info. 

Do you plan on taking the plunge and installing the Android Q beta? If so, why? Let us know below.

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