Here's why your iPhone takes longer to charge in summer

Have you noticed that your iPhone -- this also applies to most other smartphones and tablets too -- takes longer to charge during summer? Here's why, along with what you can do about it.

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Who doesn't like summer, eh? But while we like to bask in the sunshine, out gadgets don't feel the same way.

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You might have noticed that your iPhone takes longer to charge in the summer, especially when in the car or in a warm room. But why is that the case? And is there anything that you can do about it?

The reason that your devices can take longer to recharge in summer is that the warmer the battery gets, the slower the charging circuits deliver power to the device. The reason for this is twofold -- it's a safety mechanism to prevent the battery from overheating and possibly rupturing, and it also prevents possible long-term wearing of the battery.

How much of an effect can this have of charge times? It depends. I've seen iPhones in hot cars simply refuse to take a charge. Admittedly, they were really hot at the time, and probably close to shutting down because of overheating, but this is by design and not a sign that your iPhone or charger is broken.


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The iPhone -- along with most other devices -- have a temperature range in which they are comfortable operating in. According to Apple, the iPhone's operating temperature range is 32 degrees to 95 degrees F (0 degrees to 35 degrees C). Apple also provides a non-operating temperature range, which is broader, of −4 degrees to 113 degrees F (−20 degrees to 45 degrees C). Here, where the non-operating temperatures fall outside the operating temperatures, the iPhone can safely be stored but not used.

The bottom line is that if you want the best lifespan and performance out of your devices, keep them out of the baking sun in summer.

Do you leave your gadgets baking in the car or a window in summer, or do you try to find them some shade, especially when recharging? Let me know below!