/>
X
Why you can trust ZDNET : ZDNET independently tests and researches products to bring you our best recommendations and advice. When you buy through our links, we may earn a commission. Our process

'ZDNET Recommends': What exactly does it mean?

ZDNET's recommendations are based on many hours of testing, research, and comparison shopping. We gather data from the best available sources, including vendor and retailer listings as well as other relevant and independent reviews sites. And we pore over customer reviews to find out what matters to real people who already own and use the products and services we’re assessing.

When you click through from our site to a retailer and buy a product or service, we may earn affiliate commissions. This helps support our work, but does not affect what we cover or how, and it does not affect the price you pay. Neither ZDNET nor the author are compensated for these independent reviews. Indeed, we follow strict guidelines that ensure our editorial content is never influenced by advertisers.

ZDNET's editorial team writes on behalf of you, our reader. Our goal is to deliver the most accurate information and the most knowledgeable advice possible in order to help you make smarter buying decisions on tech gear and a wide array of products and services. Our editors thoroughly review and fact-check every article to ensure that our content meets the highest standards. If we have made an error or published misleading information, we will correct or clarify the article. If you see inaccuracies in our content, please report the mistake via this form.

Close

NavMan GPS 3000

If you think that paying around £2,000 for a built-in satellite navigation system for your car is excessive, why not consider enhancing your Compaq iPAQ handheld with a Global Positioning System (GPS) for about a tenth of the cost? The NavMan 3000 is towards the lower end of the range of GPS add-ons, costing £249.99 (inc. VAT; £212.76 ex. VAT). It's the same GPS hardware as offered by Compaq with its iPAQ Navigation System (iNS), but lacking a CompactFlash memory card and with a different software bundle.
Written by Andrew Swinton, Contributor on
7.0/10

Navman GPS 3000

Very good
Pros
  • Cheaper than a standalone satellite navigation system fast route calculation flexible interface.
Cons
  • No dynamic routing or voice prompts small screen can make reading the map and instructions difficult windscreen attachment not entirely secure.

If you think that paying around £2,000 for a built-in satellite navigation system for your car is excessive, why not consider enhancing your Compaq iPAQ handheld with a Global Positioning System (GPS) for about a tenth of the cost? The NavMan 3000 is towards the lower end of the range of GPS add-ons, costing £249.99 (inc. VAT; £212.76 ex. VAT). It's the same GPS hardware as offered by Compaq with its iPAQ Navigation System (iNS), but lacking a CompactFlash memory card and with a different software bundle.

What you get in the box is a GPS jacket, which incorporates a CompactFlash slot, SMARTPATH City and SMARTPATH Trip software, an in-vehicle mounting arm and a cigarette lighter power adapter. The two supplied CDs contain SMARTPATH City, with a choice of 125,000 town and city maps, and SMARTPATH Trip, which offers a range of 12 European countries longer journeys. The GPS jacket's CompactFlash slot allows you to insert a memory card and download maps when your iPAQ is docked in its cradle, conserving precious memory on the handheld itself.

To get up and running, you first attach the mounting arm's suction cup to your windscreen, slide the iPAQ into the holder, bend the mounting arm to the desired viewing angle, and finally connect the power supply from the cigarette lighter. The curly cable ought to be long enough to reach most windscreens. A word of warning: the windscreen sucker can drop off -- this happened on the second trip in our tests. Fortunately, as it was a short journey, the iPAQ wasn't attached at the time. If it had been, a cracked iPAQ display or other damage is a distinct possibility. For such an expensive bit of kit, a more secure mount really is required.

Once the GPS device has located four satellites, its software calculates your exact position to within a few metres. When combined with mapping data, a GPS device can establish the fastest route to a destination, providing turn-by-turn directions.

The route planner is easy to use. Predictive text allows it to update the drop-down menu options instantly as you type in your starting location. You have a 'crossing option' if you need to go via a particular location. You also have stopover, return, quickest route, shortest route or even walk options. Once you've selected the trip, a thin blue bar races left to right calculating thousands of road possibilities and showing a decreasing distance as it plans the journey. You can then see the entirety of the trip or zoom in to any part of it. A split screen function lets you see part map and part text instructions. The instructions scroll as you begin driving.

If you deviate from the planned route, the map shows you where you are but the instructions don't update. Also if you deviate from the instructions the map keeps your location in the centre of the screen in the direction of the blue arrow. There are no voice instructions, as in the Pocket CoPilot 2.0 software supplied with the same GPS jacket in Compaq's iPAQ Navigation System.

NavMan GPS 3000 does not currently utilise dynamic routing, which gives turn-by-turn feedback if you miss a turning, for example. However, a £150 upgrade is planned that will have voice instructions, search by postcode, day or night view and dynamic routing.

Top ZDNET Reviews

Raspberry Pi 4
raspberry-pi-4-model-b-header.jpg

Top ZDNET Reviews

Raspberry Pi 4

9
Raspberry Pi 400
raspberry-pi-400-header.jpg

Top ZDNET Reviews

Raspberry Pi 400

8.5
OnePlus Watch
oneplus-watch-3.jpg

Top ZDNET Reviews

OnePlus Watch

5.7
Samsung Galaxy Xcover Pro
samsung-xcover-pro-7.jpg

Top ZDNET Reviews

Samsung Galaxy Xcover Pro

8.4

Related

Netgear Orbi Quad-Band Mesh WiFi 6E System (RBKE963): Fast but expensive wireless mesh networking
netgear-orbi-wifi-6e-rbke963-header.jpg

Netgear Orbi Quad-Band Mesh WiFi 6E System (RBKE963): Fast but expensive wireless mesh networking

NexDock 360 Touch review: Transform your Samsung smartphone into a capable laptop
nexdock-360-5.jpg

NexDock 360 Touch review: Transform your Samsung smartphone into a capable laptop

Dell XPS 17 9710 (2021) review: A highly configurable premium 17-inch laptop
dell-xps-17-9710-header.jpg

Dell XPS 17 9710 (2021) review: A highly configurable premium 17-inch laptop