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Get online Linux training and help a school or charity for under $60

Celebrate education and take an extra $10 off online Linux training.
Written by StackCommerce, Partner on
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StackCommerce

The following content is brought to you by ZDNet partners. If you buy a product featured here, we may earn an affiliate commission or other compensation.

If you're going into the IT workforce, there's only so much on-the-job training you can expect. You simply need to know the right skills before you can even reach the interview process. For many server admin positions, that means gaining Linux proficiency. Luckily, this open-source OS is popular for a reason. Anybody can learn Linux with the proper training, and that's exactly what you'll get with the Complete 2022 Linux Certification Training Bundle.

This online education package collects 12 essential courses on Linux from the tech gurus at iCollege. Their ITProTV training courses are engaging but refreshingly free of fluff. They're full of curricula that will teach you how to use Linux in real-world IT situations for a variety of network setups.

No matter what your level of experience with Linux, there's an entry point for you here. Newcomers can start with a beginner's course that teaches the basic user interface, then move on to classes that cover shell scripting and server-side troubleshooting. You'll find courses on everything from security best practices to the latest RHEL operating system.

Best of all, you'll be able to use the advanced tutorials to train for your Linux certifications, a must if you want to work for the larger tech firms. The bundle has courses that double as study guides for the LPIC-1 and LPIC-2 exams, which can open doors to jobs as a Linux engineer or admin.

The Complete 2022 Linux Certification Training Bundle, featuring more than 110 hours of education, is price-dropped to $59 during our Back to Education event. On top of that, if you buy before August 24, $0.50 of your purchase will be donated to the school or charity, which you can vote for in an email you'll receive after purchasing. We'll announce the organization that won the vote once the event concludes, so stay tuned!

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