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This tiny recorder costs $40 and stores 750 hours of audio

You can use this voice-activated recorder for interviews, podcasts, studying, and more.
Written by StackCommerce, Partner on
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StackCommerce

The following content is brought to you by ZDNet partners. If you buy a product featured here, we may earn an affiliate commission or other compensation.

Most conversations are easily forgettable, and some simply need to be preserved. So whether you're a journalist, podcaster, or merely a student taking down notes, you need reliable voice recording that you're not going to get out of the standard recorder app on your smartphone. That's where a gadget like this 64G Mini Voice Activated Recorder comes into its own.

In terms of portability, storage, and recording quality, this device hits all the marks. First of all, it weighs in at just a few ounces, and since it's less than two inches long, you can truly carry it anywhere -- your purse, wallet, or even a shirt pocket.

But that's not the only reason this is practically a piece of spy tech that would make James Bond envious. It also has a voice activation function that allows you to record ambient sound hands-free. Once switched on, the device starts recording whenever it detects incoming noise and switches off when things go quiet.

This not only saves you battery life, but it also ensures that you never miss a word when it's time to take notes. This frees up your attention to focus on a lecturer or interviewer, as you can revisit essential details in the future. 

Speaking of battery life, this recorder can run up to 24 hours on a single charge and save over 140 hours of audio in its 64GB memory bank. In addition, the noise-dampening functions reduce fuzz and muffled audio, and the default recording setup couldn't be more straightforward. Simply switch it on or off to start and stop recording, then plug in your headphones directly or save the files to an external device to listen.

Get the 64G Mini Voice Activated Recorder now for $44.99, 15% off the $52 MSRP.

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